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Mick Galyean March 4, 2016 at 5:39 pm

Pastor Jack, one of your best and you’ve penned some good ones!

Ayden Harris March 17, 2017 at 1:12 am

I found the passage profound:

“You were blameless in your ways from the day you were created, till unrighteousness was found in you” (Ezk 28:15)

While we are born into sin, of the physical world, and must have our love of God come through faith. The angels were created sinless, of the spiritual realm, and so would most likely have a love of God that doesn’t require faith, because they are aware of His presence from existence on a higher plane than we can understand while still living.

How much horrific would it be to forsake God, when you knew full well what you were doing, than the man on earth who cries out in anger, shaking their fist against God, when they have their faith waiver. I know sin is sin in the eyes of the Lord and there’s not really a sliding scale of good sin to bad sin, but I see how to have the presence of God before you, but deny it would be worse.

Like the difference between the idol worshipers that had been punished by God to walk the desert for 40 years, and the punishment of Moses who doubted God’s power, even while in Gods undeniable presence on the mountain and had to also walk the 40 years, but was also denied entrance to the holy land he had to work hard to lead the exodus towards. They, like us saw miracles and still faltered in faith, but Moses saw God in part, and faltered in faith. How much worse for angels, who would see much more and then rebel.

I certainly don’t know much of the heart and mind of God beyond what I can gather from scripture. But it seems to be a fair reason for any emotional being (not ruled by His emotion like we often are though) to choose to have mercy and forgiveness for one creation, and choose to have no forgiveness for another. It’s like the difference between an adult child rebelling against you, or a toddler.

The adult child knows what it is they have done against you, and the consequence, while they may not have your wisdom to fully understand things from your point of view, they know well enough if they’re going to hurt you. But a toddler you can only scorn for making a mess of things at that moment, and hope that by raising them right they may correct their attitude in time, and learn to behave as you would hope before it’s too late.

Great article, gets the wheels turning, thank you!





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